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eClean Issue 22

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43 eClean Magazine States. Within three days of hire, employers must complete Form I-9, employment eligibility verification, which requires employers to examine documents to confirm the employee's citizenship or eligibility to work in the U.S. Employers can only request documentation specified on the I-9 form. Employers do not need to submit the I-9 form with the federal government but are required to keep them on file for three years after the date of hire or one year after the date of the employee's termination, whichever is later. Employers can use information taken from the Form I-9 to electronically verify the employment eligibility of newly hired employees by registering with E-Verify. Visit the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency's I-9 website to download the form and find more information. Step 4. Register with Your State's New Hire Reporting Program All employers are required to report newly hired and re-hired employees to a state directory within 20 days of their hire or rehire date. Visit the New Hires Reporting Requirements page to learn more and find links to your state›s New Hire Reporting System. Step 5. Obtain Workers' Compensation Insurance All businesses with employees are required to carry workers' compensation insurance coverage through a commercial carrier, on a self-insured basis or through their state's Workers' Compensation Insurance program. Step 6. Post Required Notices Employers are required to display certain posters in the workplace that inform employees of their rights and employer responsibilities under labor laws. Visit the Workplace Posters page for specific federal and state posters you›ll need for your business. Step 7. File Your Taxes Generally, employers who pay wages subject to income tax withholding, Social Security and Medicare taxes must file IRS Form 941, Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return. For more information, visit IRS.gov. New and existing employers should consult the IRS Employer's Tax Guide to understand all their federal tax filing requirements. Visit the state and local tax page for specific tax filing requirements for employers. Step 8. Get Organized and Keep Yourself Informed Being a good employer doesn't stop with fulfilling your various tax and reporting obligations. Maintaining a healthy and fair workplace, providing benefits and keeping employees informed about your company's policies are key to your business' success. Here are some additional steps you should take after you've hired your first employee: • Set up Recordkeeping In addition to requirements for keeping payroll records of your employees for tax purposes, certain federal employment laws also require you to keep records about your employees. The following sites provide more information about federal reporting requirements: • Tax Recordkeeping Guidance • Labor Recordkeeping Requirements • Occupational Safety and Health Act Compliance • Employment Law Guide (employee benefits chapter) • Apply Standards that Protect Employee Rights Complying with standards for employee rights in regards to equal opportunity and fair labor standards is a requirement. Following statutes and regulations for minimum wage, overtime, and child labor will help you avoid error and a lawsuit. See the Department of Labor's Employment Law Guide for up-to-date information on these statutes and regulations. Also, visit the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Fair Labor Standards Act. This article and a ton of additional resources can be found on the Small Business Administrations' website: www.SBA.gov.

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